Peer-reviewed journal articles

 

Google Scholar page

  1. Storrs, K. R. & Arnold, D. H. (2017). Shape adaptation exaggerates shape differences. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 43(1), 181-191.
  2. Kriegeskorte, N. & Storrs, K. R. (2016). Grid cells for conceptual spaces? Neuron, 92(2), 280-284.
  3. Pelekanos, V., Mur, M., & Storrs, K. R. (2016). Extracting object identity: ventral or dorsal visual stream? Journal of Neuroscience, 36(24), 6368-6370.
  4. Storrs, K. R. & Arnold, D. H. (2015). Face aftereffects involve local repulsion, not renormalization. Journal of Vision, 15(8), 1–18.
  5. Storrs, K. R. (2015). Facial age aftereffects provide some evidence for local repulsion (but none for re-normalisation). i-Perception, 6(2), 100–103.
  6. Storrs, K. R. (2015). Are high-level aftereffects perceptual? Frontiers in Psychology, 6(157), 1–4.
  7. Storrs, K. R. & Arnold, D. H. (2015). Evidence for tilt normalization can be explained by anisotropic orientation sensitivity. Journal of Vision, 15(1), 1–11.
  8. Greenaway, K. H., Storrs, K. R., Philipp, M. C., Louis, W. R., Hornsey, M. J., & Vohs, K. D. (2015). Loss of control stimulates approach motivation. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 56, 235–241.
  9. Spence, M., Storrs, K. R., & Arnold, D. H. (2014). Why the long face? the critical role of vertical configural relations in face ’barcodes’ for recognition. Journal of Vision, 14(8), 1–12.
  10. Storrs, K. R. & Arnold, D. H. (2013). Shape aftereffects reflect shape constancy operations: appearance matters. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 39(3), 616–622.
  11. Storrs, K. R. & Arnold, D. H. (2012). Not all face aftereffects are equal. Vision Research, 64, 7–16.
  12. Philipp, M. C., Storrs, K. R., & Vanman, E. J. (2012). Sociality of facial expressions in immersive virtual environments: a facial EMG study. Biological Psychology, 91(1), 17–21.

Conference presentations

  1. Storrs, K. R., Mehrer, J., Walther, A., & Kriegeskorte, N. (2017, February). Domain-specialised CNNs of realistic depth best explain FFA and PPA representations. Talk to be presented at Cosyne, Salt Lake City, Utah.
  2. Storrs, K. R., Mehrer, J., Walther, A., & Kriegeskorte, N. (2016, December). Category-specialised neural networks best explain representations in category-selective visual areas. Poster presented at the Applied Vision Association Christmas Meeting, London.
  3. Storrs, K. R., Jozwik, K., O'Keeffe, J., & Kriegeskorte, N. (2016, August). Predicting how similar two faces look, using deep convolutional neural networks and optimised stimuli. Poster presented at the European Conference on Visual Perception, Barcelona, Spain.
  4. Storrs, K. R., Jozwik, K., O'Keeffe, J., & Kriegeskorte, N. (2016, August). Predicting perceived facial similarity using deep convolutional neural networks. Poster presented at the Predictive Coding Workshop, Dartmouth College, New Hampshire.
  5. Harrison, W. H. & Storrs, K. R. (2016, May). Do these lines look straight? Poster presented at the Vision Sciences Society, St Petersburg, Florida.
  6. Storrs, K. R. & Arnold, D. H. (2015, August). Enhancing the world with mind: shape adaptation exaggerates shape differences. Poster presented at the European Conference on Visual Perception, Liverpool, UK.
  7. Arnold, D. H. & Storrs, K. R. (2015, July). Despite what you may have heard, human face and form perception (probably) don’t re-normalize. Talk presented at the Asia-Pacific Conference on Vision, Singapore.
  8. Storrs, K. R. & Arnold, D. H. (2015, May). Faces are repulsive: gender and identity aftereffects involve local repulsion, not re-normalisation. Poster presented at the Vision Sciences Society conference, St Petersburg, Florida.
  9. Storrs, K. R. (2014, December). No evidence from visual aftereffects for norm-based representation of orientations, shapes, or faces. Talk presented at the UQ School of Psychology Centre for Perception and Cognitive Neuroscience workshop, Stradbroke Island, Australia.
  10. Storrs, K. R. (2014, August). A new psychophysical test of norm-based opponent coding in face perception. Poster presented at the European Summer School on Visual Neuroscience, Rauischholzhausen, Germany.
  11. Storrs, K. R. & Arnold, D. H. (2014, May). Shape aftereffects reflect shape constancy operations: appearance matters. Poster presented at the Vision Sciences Society conference, St Petersburg, Florida.
  12. Spence, M., Storrs, K. R., & Arnold, D. H. (2014, May). Why the long face? the critical role of vertical configural relations in face ’barcodes’ for recognition. Poster presented at the Vision Sciences Society conference, St Petersburg, Florida.
  13. Storrs, K. R. (2014, May). Tilt normalisation may be explained by pre-adaptation to natural orientation statistics. Talk presented at the ModVis workshop, St Petersburg, Florida.
  14. Storrs, K. R. & Arnold, D. H. (2013, December). Shape aftereffects are more than meets the eye. Talk presented at the AVA Christmas meeting, Leuven, Belgium.
  15. Storrs, K. R. & Arnold, D. H. (2013, August). Evidence for tilt normalisation may be explained by anisotropic orientation channels. Poster presented at the European Conference on Visual Perception, Bremen, Germany.
  16. Storrs, K. R. & Arnold, D. H. (2013, April). The shape aftereffect: appearance matters. Talk presented at the Experimental Psychology Conference, Adelaide, Australia.
  17. Storrs, K. R. & Arnold, D. H. (2012, November). Shape aftereffects reflect a weighted function of retinal and surface slant information. Talk presented at the Australian Cognitive Neuroscience Conference, Brisbane, Australia.
  18. Storrs, K. R. & Arnold, D. H. (2012, May). Not all face aftereffects are equal. Poster presented at the Vision Sciences Society conference, Naples, Florida.
  19. Storrs, K. R. & Arnold, D. H. (2012, April). Not all face aftereffects are equal. Talk presented at the Experimental Psychology Conference, Sydney, Australia.
  20. Storrs, K. R. (2011, December). Not all high-level aftereffects are equal (and perhaps none is opponent coded). Talk presented at the UQ School of Psychology Centre for Perception and Cognitive Neuroscience workshop, Stradbroke Island, Australia.
  21. Greenaway, K. H., Philipp, M. C., & Storrs, K. R. (2011, July). Explaining the control–aggression effect: the case against a failure of self regulation. Talk presented at the Small Group Meeting on The Application of Self-Regulation Approaches to Social Psychological Phenomena, Stockholm, Sweden.
  22. Greenaway, K. H., Philipp, M. C., & Storrs, K. R. (2011, July). Social consequences of lacking control: possible neural pathways. Poster presented at The Nature of Prejudice: A Neuroscience Perspective colloquium, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
  23. Storrs, K. R., Diamond, A., & Arnold, D. H. (2011, May). Face aftereffects – evidence opposing opponent coding. Poster presented at the Vision Sciences Society conference, Naples, Florida.